Ambiant Review: Tioga Sequoia “Bridalveil Lager”

The beer subject: Bridalveil Lager

I am not okay with giving straight reviews of beers. Either reviewing beer bores me or I simply suck at it, or both.

So this is the closest I can come to a beer review. In the roughly 20 minutes it took to drink this, these are some thoughts and things.

BEER DETAILS:

  • Name: Bridalveil Lager.
  • Brewer: Tioga Sequoia (Fresno,CA).
  • Style: American Lager.
  • ABV: 4.5%

THOUGHTS & SETTING:

  • 3:50PM. Fresno. On my patio at a table in my backyard. 94 degrees.
  • Music: “Citizen Erased” by Muse plays in the background.
  • Woah. This beer is easy to drink – I mean that in a good way.
  • I wonder how many people know that Bridalveil Falls is in Yosemite – that can be a very dangerous hike up that trail, super slick.
  • Oh hey, a little breeze. Maybe a 10mph gust.
  • Is Muse an underrated band or are they rated properly and I just haven’t paid attention?
  • Someone odd parked across the street. [inspects]. It appears to be someone looking at the house to rent it.
  • A neighbor with their patio on the other side of the fence from my patio, has come outside. She is arguing with her boyfriend whom is still inside. She is yelling back at him things, I can’t help but overhear. The fight seems to be about a friend of his who is a woman and he was defending her. My neighbor is not okay with the amount of positive talking he is doing about this friend.
  • This is a solid Lager. As crisp as the sky is blue right now.

Thanks for coming to my first Ambient Review of a beer. Here is some Muse for you:

Hard Seltzers Ain’t Hurtin’ This Beer Geek

DC Brau hard seltzer “Grapefruit Crush”

If Beer Twitter didn’t love to talk about hard seltzers so much, I don’t think I would notice them anymore.

When seltzers started becoming big and trending and we started seeing big ends of them at the grocery store and it was White Claw Summer and all that, yes, I noticed.

But now, seltzers blend into the background for me.

I can still get all the same Indie Beer I could before the seltzer boom. The taps are mostly the same. The part of the shelf I look at for beer in the grocery store, looks the same.

Although I think the Big Beer section looks like it has more seltzers and less beer, but I really don’t know.

So, what is the fuss?

Make that money. Whatever it takes for a brewery to stay Indie and open is cool by me.

Have a new seltzer release every week. Be like Humble Sea is with their beers and slightly change one ingredient and call it a brand new name and slap a new label on it every week! Go for it.

As long as I can still get all the Craft Beer I want, have your fun with your seltzers. Just keep making beer and putting on the shelves is all I ask.

The New Yorker’s Spot On Spoof Of Brewery Tours and Bro Breweries

“Yeah, bro, I’m totally getting the IPA taste in the front”

Well done, Eddie Small, via the New Yorker.

This sendup of a brewery tour had me noding my head yes and laughing.

Highlights:

Hale Valley Brewery—one of just seventeen microbreweries in Litchfield County, Connecticut, that has the word “Valley” in its name.

….Adam & Phillip decided to open up their microbrewery in Litchfield County because, as soon as they saw how beautiful it was here, they knew it was the only place where they could make their beer taste as great as they had always imagined.

…Now we’re going to start the tour in what we call the “brewing room,” where you’ll have the opportunity to sample individual beer ingredients on their own, when they all still taste bad and nonalcoholic.

Go read it, anybody that’s noticed the occasional Business Bro Brewery or have been on one-too-many tours, will find it a fun read.

Suburban Beer Drinking

Me “Suburb Drinking” with a local beer

I don’t really know that I truly live in the suburbs.

Geographically I am in the middle of the city. My neighborhood is 70 years old. Can that still be called “the suburbs”?

I had always thought of the suburbs as like, the small towns and track homes around the city as the real suburbs.

Well anyway, I live in a house that 60 years ago, was the edge of town. So … vintage suburbs then.

Which finally leads me to: Do we drink differently in the suburbs? Are beer trends the same as the core of the city? What about people out in the country?

Do I drink more living where I am at? Less? ANY difference than if I lived in a loft downtown?

Maybe.

A different part of the city might be closer to taprooms or breweries. Another has basic liquor stores. Out in the boonies you have a small country market.

That would have to make a difference, right?

I feel like I drink more grocery store beer than anybody in a different part of the city or countryside.

Are styles used differently? More Lagers out in the boonies? More Stouts in track homes?

Guess I’ll keep trying to figure this out.

File Under: Drinking & Thinking. Habits.

Drink Tokens: A New Collecting Obsession Unlocked

Look out! I am about to get into drink token collecting. 

I saw someone on Beer Twitter (sorry I can’t remember who it is otherwise I would credit it) showing off some old drink tokens.

They looked so clean and probably very satisfying to hold in your hand, and yet I have none. 

I can remember using them in an old dive bar I would haunt (Yo, Stardust in Fresno!) – I can’t remember how or why I earned one.

Bars that have bands play will give them to the bands as a form of payment sometimes, I definitely didn’t perform with a band at Stardust… but there was a lot of me performances by me, if you know what I mean .

Anyway, they looked so cool I immediately went to E-bay to see if I could find a Fresno one, like the one I had somehow earned. I could not.

But I did go down the drink token rabbit hole and eventually purchased a nice New Jersey one – my wife’s side are all from New Jersey so I figured I’d start there since it’s slightly possible one of them held one of these tokens:

I’ll be busy on eBay looking out for the right one.